Rosh Hashanah Sermon 2021 Lev Chadash Milano

Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, shehecheyanu, v’kiy’manu, v’higiyanu laz’man hazeh.

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Sovereign of all, who has kept us alive, sustained us, and brought us to this season.

This blessing, first found in the Talmud (Berachot 54a) is commonly used to thank God for some personal joyful experience.  It was instituted for uncommon or periodical positive occurrences and experiences, such as when doing a  mitzvah for the first time that year. So we are used to reciting it on the first day of the festivals, on taking the lulav or sitting in the sukkah for example (and for those who have a second day of the festival there is a tradition to save a new fruit not eaten in that year in order to say the blessing over that on the second day), lighting the first candle of Chanukah or reading the megillah at Purim…..

It is also commonly said over major purchases or on hearing exciting news. (Mishna Brurah 225:10

There is another blessing – HaTov v’haMeitiv that gives thanks to God –  and this blessing is traditionally used slightly differently – not as a personal blessing, but instead it is used on occasions that are considered to bring pleasure to the whole community as well as the person saying the blessing. (HaTov is for the individual, HaMeitiv for the community)

Barukh atah adonay eloheynu melekh ha-olam, ha-tov v’hameytiv.  Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who is good and bestows good.

They are part of a set of blessings that are to be recited not at specific times, or even necessarily at specific events, but as a response to events that bring us joy in the moment they happen. So we read in the Talmud (Berachot)

MISHNA: One who sees a place where miracles occurred on Israel’s behalf recites: Blessed…Who performed miracles for our ancestors in this place. One who sees a place from which idolatry was eradicated recites: Blessed [is God] Who eradicated idolatry from our land.

One who sees conspicuous natural occurrences recites a blessing. For zikin and zeva’ot, which the Gemara will discuss below, for thunder, gale force winds, and lightning, manifestations of the power of the Creator, one recites: Blessed [is God] …Whose strength and power fill the world. For extraordinary  mountains, hills, seas, rivers, and deserts, one recites: Blessed [is God] …Author of creation., Rabbi Yehuda says: One who sees the great sea recites a special blessing: Blessed [is God] …Who made the great sea. As with all blessings of this type, one only recites it when he sees the sea intermittently, not on a regular basis.

For rain and other good tidings, one recites the special blessing: Blessed [is God] …Who is good and Who does good. Even for bad tidings, one recites a special blessing: Blessed…the true Judge. Similarly, when one built a new house or purchased new vessels, they recite: Blessed [is God] …Who has given us life, sustained us, and brought us to this time.

The mishna then goes on to articulate a general principle: “One recites a blessing for the bad that befalls them, just as one does for the good. Similarly, one must recite a blessing for the good that befalls them just as for the bad.”

Blessings are woven into Jewish life. The very first tractate of the Talmud is Berachot – blessings. Our central prayer, the Amidah, is framed as a series of blessings. There is a Talmudic tradition that we should say 100 blessings every day – (the tradition comes from a rabbinic interpretation of the verse in Deuteronomy (10:12) “Now Israel, what does the Eternal your God ask of you? To reverence the Eternal your God, to walk in God’s ways, to love and serve God….”  “Mah Adonai Eloheicha Sho’el may’imach?”.  In the Talmud (Menachot 43b)  The question Mah (what?) is read as “Me’ah – one hundred – so the verse would read “the Eternal your God asks one hundred of you” – and what are the hundred? They mean hundred Blessings.)

It is a midrash, using a clearly written verse as a peg on which to hang an important idea – saying blessings when doing ordinary activities is an integral part of Judaism, it helps us to see the extraordinary in quotidian behaviours . Blessing God in some way allows us to perceive God, to love God and to be active in God’s service.

Why would the Rabbis of the Talmud twist the words in order to bring about this idea? I think it is because they were aware of the power of thankfulness to strengthen us.

And more than that: if we bless God in good times and in bad, reactively as well as in a formulaic pattern, as part of the rhythm of our lives and in moments of powerful emotion – then we are able to move our focus outside of our own existence and see ourselves not only as individuals, but as individuals who are in relation to the community, to the environment we live in, and to the Divinity.

This strand of blessings woven into our daily existence, with highlights that happen when a moment or event occurs to which we must react, shapes our thought and our sense of self.  And most of all it gives us moments to hold on to, to connect with, and to infuse us with hope.

The Shehecheyanu blessing is a complex and multi-layered one. It is said not only in relation to time but to events. More particularly it is not usually said during a unique once-in-a-lifetime experience, but during an event we hope to repeat: the mitzvot of the festivals in the coming year, the joy of a new purchase etc.

So built into its recitation is the idea of the future, the idea that we look forward with hope.

While we thank God for bringing us safely to this time, we are already calculating that other similar experiences will be ours in coming years.

Hope is a particularly Jewish value. Different from Optimism (which is a generally a passive trait, an attitude which reflects the belief that things will work out well) Hope is an active choice. We may (or may not) await a messiah, but we cannot wait for that messiah to make things better for our world – the messiah will come when WE have made the world fit for them. As my colleague Rabbi Michael Marmur once wrote:  “Standing around and trusting that things will work themselves out is indefensible on moral and theological grounds.” Greta Thunberg’s challenge on climate change in her speech to the UN puts it even better:

“This is all wrong. I shouldn’t be up here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean. Yet you all come to us young people for hope. How dare you!”   (Sept 25th 2019)

The Hebrew word for hope is “Tikvah”, and it has a root meaning of a cord or a rope, a binding of threads together into a long piece. It is found in bible in the story of Rahab who let down a scarlet cord (Tikvah) and so saved herself and her family during the destruction of Jericho by Joshua. It is also in Jeremiah ““For I know the plans I have for you declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope [tikvah]” (Jeremiah 29:11). The Psalmist calls God “tikvati” (my hope) (71:5), bound to God in trust.

Hope in the Hebrew bible is the twisting of the threads of our existence into a kind of  rope; making up the complicated cord that links us across time from the past to the present to the future. It is the choice we make in trusting in God. The Shehecheyanu prayer acknowledges the hope that has so far brought us into the present, while looking to a future we choose to believe will come. We will say this blessing over this event again.

In the ancient pre-biblical world, the world was in the hands of other powers. There was nothing we could do to take our fate into our own hands. We could appease, we could second guess, but ultimately we had little influence over the future.

The Hebrew bible changes that idea radically. It is full of stories with beginnings but no ends – God tells Abram to leave Haran and go to a place God will show him; God tells Moses “ehyeh asher ehyeh” – I will be whatever I will be; Torah ends with Moses surveying the land but with everyone still on the far side of the Jordan…   The rest of the story is for us to bring forth, to make happen with our own choices.  We have many beginnings in the narratives in bible, indeed the very first word is about beginnings -bereishit – but then the stories require us to have agency, to make choices, to choose hope.  Our lives are all about what we do, not what God decides for us.  Talmud too – and the system of halacha – leaves choices to us, authority is given to the leaders of each generation for their own generation rather than fixed law for all time.

In the Talmud (shabbat 31a) is a list of questions that Rava says we will be asked after we die. In addition to asking if we acted properly in business, set aside time for torah study etc is the question “tzafita lishuah” – literally “did you await salvation”, but understood to mean –“ did you live with hope?”

We are obliged to live with hope. To make the choice to hope. By doing so we keep the thread of Tikvah in good order so that it will take us from past to present to future, allowing us to hold on even in difficult times, to pass our values and learning onward.

When we say blessings, in particular the blessing formula, are we blessing God or are we stating that blessing is sourced in God?  The word Breicha, meaning a pool or a well-spring, derives from the same verbal root, and reminds us that blessings are a deep source within us, refreshing and renewing us.

The word for hope – Tikvah – is also intimately connected with a body of renewing water – the mikveh or ritual bath that we use for ritual purification and for spiritual renewal. The very first mikveh is the body of water found in the creation story in Genesis, when God brings forth our world ready for us to live in it (Gen 1:9). Jeremiah calls God the “Mikveh Yisrael” (17:13) “the Hope of Israel…the source of living waters”.  By saying the blessings, by choosing hope and by locating ourselves across time, we are immersing ourselves in renewal, in resilience, in revitalisation. We are choosing continuing beginning, ready to take part in our world.

Somewhere in these entwined words is a powerful idea, an idea that links us to the past as far back as creation with all its hopes, and into the future with all its uncertainty. The choice to hope is what keeps us connected in time and in space, in spiritual relationship and in lived experiences. One way to renew ourselves, to keep us going, to give us resilience is to make the active choice to keep hoping. One way to choose hope is to notice again and again that nothing is too trivial, too good or too bad to let us stop and consider the source of all blessings.

On many Jewish tombstones is the acronym Taf Nun Tzadi Beit Hey which stands for the phrase “t’hi nishmato/a tzrura bitzrur ha’chayim” – may their soul be bound up in the ropes of life. Each of us lives the thread of our own life, and each of us is intimately bound with the threads of the lives of others – with those who came before us, and with those who will come after us, and with those with whom we share our lives. Each of us is held in the tapestry of those woven corded threads. And in this way, as William Stafford wrote

“There’s a thread you follow. It goes among

things that change. But it doesn’t change.

People wonder about what you are pursuing.

You have to explain about the thread.

But it is hard for others to see.

While you hold it you can’t get lost.

Tragedies happen; people get hurt

or die; and you suffer and get old.

Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding.

You don’t ever let go of the thread.  (William Stafford, The Way it I)

When we say the Shehecheyanu blessing we are doing more than giving gratitude for having lived to see this event. We are holding onto the thread of hope, making an active choice to bind ourselves to our people’s past and to our future, making an active commitment to living our present lives as fully and as meaningfully as we can.

So on this first day of the festival, let us say once more the blessing

Baruch Ata Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha’olam, she’he’cheyanu, v’kiy’manu v’higianu lazman hazeh

Shanah Tovah.

Sermone di Rosh Hashanah 5782 – 2021 Milano

Di rav Sylvia Rothschild

            Baruch Attà, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, shehecheyanu, v’kiy’manu, v’higiyanu laz’man hazeh.

            Benedetto sei tu, Adonai nostro Dio, Sovrano di tutti, che ci ha tenuti in vita, ci ha sostenuto e ci ha fatto arrivare  a questo tempo.

            Questa benedizione, che si trova per la prima volta nel Talmud (Berachot 54a), è comunemente usata per ringraziare Dio per alcune esperienze gioiose personali. È stato istituita per eventi ed esperienze positivi non comuni o periodici, come quando si compie una mitzvà per la prima volta in un anno. Siamo quindi abituati a recitarla il primo giorno di festa, per esempio prendendo il lulav o sedendo nella sukkà (e per chi ha un secondo giorno di festa c’è la tradizione di mettere da parte un nuovo frutto non mangiato in quell’anno per dire la benedizione su quello il secondo giorno), accendendo la prima candela di Chanukkà o leggendo la megillà a Purim…..

            Si dice anche comunemente durante gli acquisti importanti o dopo aver ascoltato notizie entusiasmanti. (Mishna Brurà 225:10)

            C’è un’altra benedizione: HaTov v’haMeitiv che rende grazie a Dio, e questa benedizione è tradizionalmente usata in modo leggermente diverso, non come benedizione personale, ma in occasioni che sono considerate di piacere per l’intera comunità così come per la persona che pronuncia la benedizione (HaTov è per l’individuo, HaMeitiv per la comunità).

            Barukh Attà Adonay Eloheynu Melekh ha-olam, ha-tov v’hameytiv. Benedetto sei tu, Adonai, nostro Dio, Sovrano dell’universo, che è buono e dona il bene.

            Fanno parte di una serie di benedizioni che non devono essere recitate in momenti specifici, oppure necessariamente in specifici eventi, ma come risposta a eventi che ci portano gioia nel momento in cui accadono. Così leggiamo nel Talmud (Berachot):

            MISHNA – Colui che vede un luogo dove sono avvenuti miracoli per conto di Israele recita: Benedetto… chi ha compiuto miracoli per i nostri antenati in questo luogo. Colui che vede un luogo da cui è stata sradicata l’idolatria recita: Benedetto [è Dio] che ha sradicato l’idolatria dalla nostra terra.

Chi vede eventi naturali cospicui recita una benedizione. Per zikin e zeva’ot, che la Gemara discuterà più avanti, per il tuono, venti di burrasca e fulmini, manifestazioni del potere del Creatore, si recita: Benedetto [è Dio] … la cui forza e potenza riempiono il mondo. Per straordinarie montagne, colline, mari, fiumi e deserti, si recita: Benedetto [è Dio] …Autore della creazione, Rabbi Yehuda dice: Chi vede il grande mare recita una benedizione speciale: Benedetto [è Dio] …Che ha creato il grande mare. Come tutte le benedizioni di questo tipo, la si recita solo quando si vede il mare a intermittenza, non con regolarità.

Per la pioggia e altre buone novelle, si recita la benedizione speciale: Benedetto [è Dio] … Chi è buono e Che fa il bene. Anche per le cattive notizie si recita una benedizione speciale: Benedetto…il vero Giudice. Allo stesso modo, quando uno costruisce una nuova casa o acquista nuove stoviglie, recita: Benedetto [è Dio] … Che ci ha dato la vita, ci ha sostenuto e ci ha fatto arrivare  a questo tempo”.

            La Mishna prosegue poi articolando un principio generale: Si recita una benedizione per il male che capita, proprio come si recita per il bene. Allo stesso modo, si deve recitare una benedizione per il bene che  capita, così come per il male”.

            Le benedizioni sono intessute nella vita ebraica. Il primissimo trattato del Talmud è Berachot, benedizioni. La nostra preghiera centrale, l’Amidà, è inquadrata come una serie di benedizioni. C’è una tradizione talmudica secondo cui dovremmo dire cento benedizioni ogni giorno, la tradizione deriva da un’interpretazione rabbinica del versetto in Deuteronomio (10:12) “Ora Israele, cosa ti chiede l’Eterno, il tuo Dio? Per riverire l’Eterno tuo Dio, per camminare nelle vie di Dio, per amare e servire Dio….” “Ma Adonai Eloheicha Sho’el may’imach?” Nel Talmud (Menachot 43b) La domanda (cosa?) è letta come Me’à, cento, così il versetto direbbe “l’Eterno il tuo Dio ne chiede cento”, e cos’è cento? Significa cento benedizioni.

È un midrash, usare un versetto chiaramente scritto come un piolo su cui appendere un’idea importante: dire benedizioni quando si fanno attività ordinarie è parte integrante dell’ebraismo, ci aiuta a vedere lo straordinario nei comportamenti quotidiani. Benedire Dio in qualche modo ci permette di percepire Dio, di amare Dio e di essere attivi al servizio di Dio.

            Perché i rabbini del Talmud dovrebbero distorcere le parole per realizzare questa idea? Penso che sia perché erano consapevoli del potere di rafforzamento della gratitudine. E ancora di più: se benediciamo Dio nei momenti buoni e in quelli cattivi, sia in modo reattivo che in uno schema convenzionale, come parte del ritmo della nostra vita e nei momenti di forte emozione, allora siamo in grado di spostare la nostra attenzione al di fuori della nostra stessa esistenza e vederci non solo come singoli individui, ma come individui in relazione alla comunità, con l’ambiente in cui viviamo e con la Divinità.

            Questo filone di benedizioni intrecciato nella nostra esistenza quotidiana, con momenti salienti che accadono quando si verifica un episodio o un evento a cui noi dobbiamo reagire, modella il nostro pensiero e il nostro senso di sé. E soprattutto ci dà momenti a cui aggrapparci, connetterci e infonderci speranza.

            La benedizione Shehecheyanu è complessa e multi-stratificata. Si pronuncia non solo in relazione al tempo ma agli eventi. Più in particolare, non si dice di solito durante un’esperienza unica, irripetibile, ma durante un evento che speriamo di ripetere: le mitzvot delle festività del prossimo anno, la gioia di un nuovo acquisto ecc.

Così incorporata nella sua recitazione c’è l’idea del futuro, l’idea di guardare avanti con speranza.

Mentre ringraziamo Dio per averci portato sani e salvi in ​​questo momento, stiamo già calcolando che avremo altre esperienze simili nei prossimi anni.

            La speranza è un valore particolarmente ebraico. A differenza dell’ottimismo (che è generalmente un tratto passivo, un atteggiamento che riflette la convinzione che le cose funzioneranno bene) la speranza è una scelta attiva. Possiamo (o meno) aspettare un messia, ma non possiamo aspettare che quel messia renda le cose migliori per il nostro mondo, il messia verrà quando NOI avremo reso il mondo adatto a lui. Come ha scritto una volta il mio collega rabbino Michael Marmur: “Rimanere in piedi e avere fiducia che le cose funzioneranno da sole è indifendibile per motivi morali e teologici“. La sfida di Greta Thunberg sui cambiamenti climatici nel suo discorso alle Nazioni Unite lo esprime ancora meglio: “Questo è tutto sbagliato. Non dovrei essere quassù. Dovrei tornare a scuola dall’altra parte dell’oceano. Eppure venite tutti da noi giovani per la speranza. Come osate!” (25 settembre 2019)

            La parola ebraica per speranza è “Tikvà”, e il significato della radice da cui deriva è la parola  filo o corda, un legame di fili tenuti assieme in un lungo tratto. Si trova nella Bibbia nella storia di Raab che lasciò cadere una corda scarlatta (Tikvà) e così salvò se stessa e la sua famiglia durante la distruzione di Gerico da parte di Giosuè. È anche in Geremia “Poiché io sono consapevole dei progetti che nutro per voi, dice il Signore, progetti di pace e non di sventura, per darvi avvenire e  speranza [tikvà]” (Geremia 29:11). Il Salmista chiama Dio “tikvati” (la mia speranza) (71:5), si lega a Dio nella fiducia.

            La speranza nella Bibbia ebraica è l’attorcigliamento dei fili della nostra esistenza in una specie di corda; componendo il complicato cordone che ci lega nel tempo dal passato al presente al futuro. È la scelta che facciamo nel confidare in Dio. La preghiera Shehecheyanu riconosce la speranza che finora ci ha portato nel presente, mentre guardiamo a un futuro che scegliamo di credere arriverà. Diremo questa benedizione su questo evento ancora.

            Nell’antico mondo pre-biblico, il mondo era nelle mani di altre potenze. Non c’era niente che potessimo fare per prendere il nostro destino nelle nostre mani. Potevamo cercare di placare o potevamo indovinare, ma alla fine avevamo avuto poca influenza sul futuro.

La Bibbia ebraica cambia radicalmente questa idea. È pieno di storie con un inizio ma senza fine: Dio dice ad Abramo di lasciare Haran e andare in un luogo che Dio gli mostrerà; Dio dice a Mosè “ehyè asher ehyè” – sarò ciò che sarò; la Torà termina con Mosè che esamina la terra ma con tutti ancora dall’altra parte del Giordano… Dobbiamo portare avanti il resto della storia, realizzarlo con le nostre scelte. Abbiamo molti inizi nelle narrazioni nella Bibbia, in effetti la primissima parola riguarda gli inizi, bereishit, ma poi le storie richiedono a noi di avere una motivazione, di fare delle scelte, di scegliere la speranza. Le nostre vite riguardano tutto ciò che noi facciamo, non ciò che Dio decide per noi. Anche il Talmud, e il sistema della Halachà, lascia a noi delle scelte, l’autorità è data ai leader di ogni generazione per la propria generazione invece che una legge fissa per sempre.

            Nel Talmud (shabbat 31a) c’è un elenco di domande che Rava dice che ci verranno poste dopo la morte. Oltre a chiederci se abbiamo agito correttamente negli affari, dedicato del tempo allo studio della Torà ecc. è la domanda “tzafita lishuà” – letteralmente “hai aspettato la salvezza”, ma inteso come “hai vissuto con speranza?

            Siamo obbligati a vivere con speranza, di fare la scelta di sperare. In questo modo manteniamo in buon ordine il filo di Tikvà in modo che ci porti dal passato al presente al futuro, permettendoci di resistere anche nei momenti difficili, di trasmettere i nostri valori e di imparare andando verso il futuro.

            Quando diciamo benedizioni, in particolare la formula di benedizione, stiamo benedicendo Dio o stiamo affermando che la benedizione proviene da Dio? La parola Breicha, che significa piscina o sorgente, deriva dalla stessa radice verbale e ci ricorda che le benedizioni sono una fonte profonda dentro di noi, che ci rinfresca e ci rinnova.

            La parola per speranza, Tikvà, è anche intimamente connessa con un corpo di acqua rinnovatrice: il mikvè, o bagno , che usiamo per la purificazione rituale e per il rinnovamento spirituale. Il primissimo mikvè è il corpo d’acqua che si trova nella storia della creazione nella Genesi, quando Dio fa emergere il nostro mondo pronto per farci vivere in esso (Gen 1:9). Geremia chiama Dio il “Mikvè Yisrael” (17:13) “la Speranza d’Israele… la sorgente delle acque vive”. Pronunciando le benedizioni, scegliendo la speranza e collocandoci nel tempo, ci stiamo immergendo nel rinnovamento, nella resilienza, nella rivitalizzazione. Stiamo scegliendo di continuare l’inizio, pronti a far parte del nostro mondo.

            Da qualche parte in queste parole intrecciate c’è un’idea potente, un’idea che ci collega al passato, fino alla creazione, con tutte le sue speranze, e al futuro con tutte le sue incertezze. La scelta di sperare è ciò che ci tiene connessi nel tempo e nello spazio, nelle relazioni spirituali e nelle esperienze vissute. Un modo per rinnovarci, per andare avanti, per darci resilienza è fare la scelta attiva di continuare a sperare. Un modo per scegliere la speranza è notare nuovamente che niente è troppo banale, troppo buono o troppo cattivo per permetterci di fermarci a considerare la fonte di tutte le benedizioni.

            Su molte lapidi ebraiche c’è l’acronimo Taf Nun Tzadi Beit Hey che sta per la frase “t’hi nishmato/a tzrura bitzrur ha’chayim” – possa la loro anima essere legata alle corde della vita. Ciascuno di noi vive il filo della propria vita, e ciascuno di noi è intimamente legato ai fili della vita degli altri: con coloro che sono venuti prima di noi, con coloro che verranno dopo di noi e con coloro con cui condividiamo le nostre vite. Ognuno di noi è trattenuto nell’arazzo di quei fili intrecciati. E in questo modo, come scrisse William Stafford:

            C’è un filo che segui. Va tra le cose

            che cambiano. Ma il filo non cambia.

            Le persone si chiedono cosa stai seguendo.

            Devi spiegare cos’è il filo.

            Ma per gli altri è difficile da vedere.

            Mentre lo tieni non ti puoi perdere.

            Le tragedie accadono; le persone si fanno male

            o muoiono; e tu soffri e invecchi.

            Niente di ciò che fai può fermare lo svolgersi del tempo.

            Non lasciare mai andare il filo.

                                                (William Stafford, The Way it Is)

            Quando diciamo la benedizione Shehecheyanu stiamo facendo di più che ringraziare per aver vissuto fino a vedere questo evento. Manteniamo il filo della speranza, facendo una scelta attiva per legarci al passato e al futuro del nostro popolo, impegnandoci attivamente a vivere le nostre vite presenti nel modo più completo e significativo possibile.

            Quindi, in questo primo giorno di festa, diciamo ancora una volta la benedizione:

Baruch Atatà Adonai, Eloheinu Melech ha’olam, she’he’cheyanu, v’kiy’manu v’higianu lazman hazeh

Shanà Tovà.

Traduzione dall’inglese di Eva Mangialajo Rantzer

1 thought on “Rosh Hashanah Sermon 2021 Lev Chadash Milano

  1. I love this thank you and ShanA Tovah.

    It’s true for those who hold the thread and stand resilient in the winds it is difficult to explain to others who only Panic and only see the negative side of any change…it’s a difficult journey to remain in trust to a higher purpose.

    Natasha x

    On Tue, 7 Sep 2021 at 22:28, rabbisylviarothschild wrote:

    > sylviarothschild posted: ” Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, > shehecheyanu, v’kiy’manu, v’higiyanu laz’man hazeh. Blessed are You, Adonai > our God, Sovereign of all, who has kept us alive, sustained us, and brought > us to this season. This blessing, first found i” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s