Va’era – signs and wonders are warnings: ignoring them may cost more than we can bear

L’italiano segue l’inglese

When Pharaoh instructed the Hebrew midwives Shifra and Puah to kill every new-born Hebrew baby boy (Exodus 1:15,16) he clearly thought he was responding  appropriately to the Egyptian nationalist fear that the population of Hebrews living amongst his people was increasing at an alarming rate and might become what we would now call a “fifth column”.  The murdering of the male children would ensure they could never grow into a military force, the keeping alive of the female children would ultimately provide both labour and more Egyptian children.

Besides the fact that, like all practitioners of the Great Replacement Theory, the fearers  were inventing a conspiracy against themselves that simply did not exist, and using it to try to control and oppress others – Pharaoh’s move acted against the promise of God to Abraham, a promise of many descendants and great fruitfulness.

For a while the actions of Shifra and Puah mitigated any effect of his decree – but they could not do so forever. In the biblical understanding of the world and the covenantal promise with God, something was seriously awry with decree of murder against new-born Hebrew boys, and the equilibrium had to be restored.

The conversations between Moses and God  begin with God noticing the pain and sorrow of the Hebrew slaves (3:6ff) and entering history  in order to address the problem of their oppression. God tells Moses to introduce himself and his experience to the Israelite people, and then go with the elders of that community to Pharaoh to request a three day ceremonial to God in the wilderness. At this point God notes that Pharaoh will not accede to the request, except with a “yad hazakah – a mighty hand”, and that God will smite Egypt with God’s “nifla’ot   נִפְלְאֹתַי” – wondrous events, and after that Pharaoh will let them go (Exodus 3:16-20)

When Moses objects that he will not be believed by the Israelites, God gives him two “signs אֹתוֹת” , and then offers a third – prefiguring the Nile being turned into blood, but on a much smaller scale (Exodus 4:1-9)

These two words – “signs” and “wonders” are the words used for most of what we today tend to describe as “plagues”. And in fact the word מגפה – translated as plague – does not occur until very much later in the narrative – in Exodus 9:14. Six events happen before the word is used – the Nile water is turned to blood, many frogs appear, followed by lice or gnats, then flies appear everywhere, the cattle and other animals become diseased, then everyone – human and beast – breaks out in boils. Only after Pharaoh is unmoved by the distress of everyone including his own magicians, does God say “For I will this time send all My plagues on your person (heart), and on your servants, and on your people; that you may know that there is none like Me in all the earth.”(9:14)

There follows the extraordinary thunderstorm of hail and of intermittent fire that struck and devastated everywhere in the land of Egypt  – except the land of Goshen where Joseph had first settled his family:   “there was hail, and fire flashing up amidst the hail, very grievous, such as had not been in all the land of Egypt since it became a nation.  And the hail smote throughout all the land of Egypt all that was in the field, both human and beast; and the hail smote every herb of the field, and broke every tree of the field.  Only in the land of Goshen, where the children of Israel were, was there no hail. (9:24-26). This is where our sidra ends. Next week’s reading continues the narrative with its climax: locusts which destroy all the remaining vegetation, the thick and tangible darkness that lasts for three days (except in Goshen) and finally and most terribly of all, resonating with Pharaoh’s original decree and even more extensive – the death of the first born child of every person from Pharaoh to the slave women and the cattle.

We tend when we read this narrative to fix on the battle between Pharaoh and God – and ask ourselves just why God allows so many to suffer in order to get Pharaoh to understand and the slaves to be able to leave.  We look at the patterning – the warnings and the lack of warnings; the Pharaonic response to allow the Hebrews to go -which he then revokes. The “hardening of the heart” – what it means, who does it and why…. But this year I noticed the very simple words “nifla’ot” and “ot” – the wonders and the signs – all of which describe nothing very magical but a logical sequence of consequences – stagnant polluted water leading to dead fish and escaping frogs; lice, flies, diseased animals and human beings as the biting insects and disease vectors grow in the surroundings – only with the odd mix of ice and fire does the nature of the “message” change – now something is deeply deeply unnatural, the world is in chaos, the normal expectation of weather systems is destroyed –and so it goes on.

In this narrative we see God “speaking” to human beings in a series of signs, of odd and unexpected activity. Only when these signs have been comprehensively and frequently ignored, do we move on to the real plagues – the all-consuming locusts who leave neither food nor seed, the darkness and the deaths within every family.

The world we live in is also experiencing the signs of work of creation being dismantled. We have chosen to challenge God or science – take your pick – and assumed that we can continue to create and consume energy, continue to pump rubbish into our waterways and seas, continue to behave as if we are not the care-takers of the world but the owners and rightful plunderers of it.

The signs have been with us for some time – strange weather systems, hotter summers, droughts, famines, torrential floods, tsunamis…… These are not plagues but they are warnings that all is not well, that our choices are disturbing the equilibrium of our world, that if we continue to behave as we have, there will be tragic consequences.

Va’era – segni e prodigi sono avvertimenti: ignorarli può costare più di quanto possiamo sopportare

Quando il Faraone diede istruzioni alle levatrici ebree Shifra e Pu’à di uccidere ogni neonato maschio ebreo (Esodo 1: 15,16), pensò chiaramente di rispondere in maniera appropriata ai timori nazionalisti egiziani che la popolazione di Ebrei, che viveva in mezzo al suo popolo, fosse in aumento con un tasso allarmante e che sarebbe potuta diventare quella che oggi chiameremmo una “quinta colonna”. L’assassinio di bambini maschi avrebbe garantito che essi non sarebbero mai diventati una forza militare, il mantenimento in vita delle bambine alla fine avrebbe fornito sia manodopera che più bambini egiziani.

Oltre al fatto che, come tutti i praticanti della Grande Teoria della Sostituzione, stava inventando una cospirazione inesistente contro se stesso e la usava per cercare di controllare e opprimere gli altri, la mossa del Faraone agiva contro la promessa di Dio ad Abramo, una promessa di molti discendenti e grande fecondità.

Per un po’ le azioni di Shifra e Pu’à mitigarono qualsiasi effetto del suo decreto, ma non poterono farlo per sempre. Secondo la visione biblica del mondo e nella promessa dell’alleanza con Dio, il decreto di uccidere tutti i neonati maschi ebrei era qualcosa di fortemente sbagliato, e l’equilibrio doveva essere ripristinato.

Le conversazioni tra Mosè e Dio iniziano con Dio che nota il dolore e la disperazione degli schiavi ebrei (3: 6 sgg) ed interviene nella storia per affrontare il problema della loro oppressione. Dio dice a Mosè di presentare se stesso e la sua esperienza al popolo israelita, e poi andare con gli anziani di quella comunità dal Faraone per richiedere un cerimoniale di tre giorni a Dio nel deserto. A questo punto Dio nota che il Faraone non acconsentirà alla richiesta, se non per mezzo di una “yad hazakà – una mano potente”, e quindi Dio colpisce l’Egitto con le sue “nifla’ot נִפְלְאֹתַי”, eventi meravigliosi, dopo di ciò il Faraone li lascerà andare. (Esodo 3: 16-20)

Quando Mosè obietta che non verrà creduto dagli israeliti, Dio gli dà due “segni אֹתוֹת”,  quindi ne offre un terzo, prefigurando il Nilo trasformato in sangue, ma su scala molto più piccola (Esodo 4: 1-9)

Queste due parole: “segni” e “meraviglie”, sono le parole usate per la maggior parte di ciò che oggi tendiamo a descrivere come “piaghe”. E in effetti la parola מגפה , tradotta come peste, non compare che molto più tardi nella narrazione, in Esodo 9:14. Sei eventi accadono prima che la parola venga usata: l’acqua del Nilo viene trasformata in sangue, compaiono molte rane, seguite da pidocchi o moscerini, quindi compaiono mosche ovunque, il bestiame e altri animali si ammalano, quindi tutti, umani e animali, si riempiono di bubboni. Solo dopo che il Faraone è indifferente all’angoscia di tutti, compresa quella dei suoi maghi, Dio dice: “Questa volta manderò tutte le mie piaghe sulla tua persona (cuore), sui tuoi servi e sul tuo popolo; che tu possa sapere che non c’è nessuno come Me in tutta la terra” (9:14).

Segue lo straordinario temporale della grandine e del fuoco intermittente che colpì e devastò ovunque il paese d’Egitto, tranne la terra di Goshen dove Giuseppe aveva inizialmente insediato la sua famiglia: “c’era grandine e il fuoco si accese in mezzo alla grandine, molto intensa, come non era stato in tutto il paese d’Egitto da quando era diventato una nazione. E la grandine colpì in tutto i paese d’Egitto tutto ciò che era nel campo, sia umano che bestia; e la grandine colpì ogni erba del campo e spezzò ogni albero del campo. Solo nella terra di Goshen, dove erano i figli d’Israele, non c’era grandine” (9: 24-26). Qui è dove termina la nostra sidrà. La lettura della prossima settimana continua la narrazione con il suo apice narrativo: locuste che distruggono tutta la vegetazione rimanente, l’oscurità densa e tangibile che dura tre giorni (tranne a Goshen) e, infine, e più terribile di tutto, in risonanza con il decreto originale del Faraone e ancora più ampio, la morte del primogenito di ogni persona, dal Faraone, alle donne schiave e al bestiame.

Si tende, nella lettura di questa narrazione, a concentrarsi sul conflitto tra il Faraone e Dio, ci si chiede perché Dio permetta a così tante persone di soffrire per far capire a Faraone e che gli schiavi possano andarsene. Osserviamo il modello: gli avvertimenti e la mancanza di avvertimenti; la risposta faraonica per consentire agli ebrei di andare, che viene poi revocata. L’ “indurimento del cuore”, cosa significa, chi lo fa e perché … Ma quest’anno ho notato le parole molto semplici “nifla’ot” e “ot”, le meraviglie e i segni, che non descrivono nulla di molto magico, ma una sequenza logica di conseguenze, acqua inquinata stagnante che porta alla morte dei pesci e alla fuga delle rane; pidocchi, mosche, animali ed esseri umani malati mentre gli insetti pungenti e i vettori di malattia crescono nei dintorni, soltanto con lo strano mix di ghiaccio e fuoco cambia la natura del “messaggio”: ora è qualcosa di profondamente innaturale, il mondo è nel caos, la normale aspettativa dei sistemi meteorologici viene distrutta, e così via.

In questa narrazione vediamo Dio “parlare” agli esseri umani in una serie di segni, di strane e inaspettate attività. Solo quando questi segni sono stati completamente e frequentemente ignorati, passiamo alle vere piaghe: le locuste che consumano tutto e che non lasciano né cibo né seme, l’oscurità e la morte all’interno di ogni famiglia.

Anche il mondo in cui viviamo sta vivendo i segnali dello smantellamento del  lavoro di creazione. Abbiamo scelto di sfidare Dio o la scienza, a voi la scelta, e abbiamo ipotizzato che possiamo continuare a creare e consumare energia, continuare a pompare immondizia nei nostri corsi d’acqua e nei nostri mari, continuare a comportarci come se non fossimo gli assistenti del mondo ma ne fossimo i proprietari e i legittimi saccheggiatori.

I segni ci accompagnano da un po’ di tempo: strani sistemi meteorologici, estati più calde, siccità, carestie, inondazioni torrenziali, tsunami …… Queste non sono piaghe ma sono avvertimenti che non tutto va bene, che le nostre scelte stanno disturbando l’equilibrio del nostro mondo, che se continuiamo a comportarci come abbiamo fatto finora, ci saranno conseguenze tragiche.

Traduzione dall’inglese di Eva Mangialajo Rantzer

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s