Parashat Yitro: the first learning of the people is that the earth belongs to God

L’italiano segue l’inglese

“If you will obey Me faithfully and keep My covenant, you will be My treasured possession among all the peoples. Indeed, all the earth is Mine. And you shall be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.” (Exodus 19:5-6)

The setting is shortly before the giving of the Torah at Sinai. God has called Moses up the mountain and told him what he must say to the Israelites encamped below.  There is about to be a particular agreement made between them and God, and embedded in it will be a special relationship – conditional on the people of Israel obeying God and keeping the covenant, they will become a “segulah” – a treasure, and they will become a nation with a special priestly role in the world. The idea is repeated in several places in bible, but in this (first) iteration, is the additional phrase “Ki li col ha’aretz” – all the earth is Mine”

There is a parallel passage in the book of Leviticus – in parashat Behar, which claims to be reporting  that which was said at Sinai, we are told “(25:23) “ And the land shall not be sold in perpetuity; for the land is Mine; for you are strangers and settlers with Me” Ki li ha’aretz” – for the earth is Mine.

At Sinai, when the people meet God, the message is made very clear –the earth and all that is in it is ultimately the possession of God. The plagues which had allowed them to be free of their slavery – these were phenomena of God. Sinai and her mysterious  shaking/smoking/shofar is also a manifestation of God’s power in the world. God is fully in charge of the earth – the world and everything in it is subject to God and God’s will.

At Sinai in parashat Yitro and beyond, the people will receive not only the Asseret haDibrot, the Ten Commandments – they will also receive the Mishpatim, all the laws and sub-clauses of the covenant with God. And many of these are to do with proper treatment of the land.  In the resonant text in Leviticus quoted above, they will receive the laws of shemittah and yovel – the cycle of letting the land rest, and of liberating and redistributing the land itself every 50 years.

When God introduces Godself to the people, it is with the phrase “for all the earth is Mine”. In part this is a necessary clarification of monotheism – there is only the one God, not the many manifestations beloved by the ancient world of agricultural peoples. But it is also the clarification that we are not – and never shall be – the owners of the earth. We are at best its stewards; it can never be sold to others or worked into barrenness. It is not something to be exploited or used to give us status or power over others. As the psalmist writes (Psalm 24)

לַֽ֭יהֹוָה הָאָ֣רֶץ וּמְלוֹאָ֑הּ תֵּ֝בֵ֗ל וְי֣שְׁבֵי בָֽהּ: ב כִּי ה֖וּא עַל־יַמִּ֣ים יְסָדָ֑הּ וְעַל־נְ֝הָר֗וֹת יְכוֹנְנֶֽהָ: ג מִי־יַֽ֭עֲלֶה בְהַ֣ר יְהֹוָ֑ה וּמִי־יָ֝קוּם בִּמְק֥וֹם קָדְשֽׁוֹ: ד נְקִ֥י כַפַּ֗יִם וּבַ֢ר לֵ֫בָ֥ב אֲשֶׁ֤ר לֹא־נָשָׂ֣א לַשָּׁ֣וְא נַפְשִׁ֑י וְלֹ֖א נִשְׁבַּ֣ע לְמִרְמָֽה: ה יִשָּׂ֣א בְ֭רָכָה מֵאֵ֣ת יְהֹוָ֑ה וּ֝צְדָקָ֗ה מֵאֱ֘לֹהֵ֥י יִשְׁעֽוֹ:

The earth is the Eternal’s and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein

For God has founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the floods. Who shall ascend into the mountain of the Eternal? and who shall stand in God’s holy place?  The one who has clean hands, and a pure heart;  who has not taken My name in vain, and has not sworn deceitfully.  That one shall receive a blessing from the Eternal, and righteousness from the God of salvation.

Our agreement with God is predicated on our good relationship with the land. And the land’s fertility and accommodation to us is predicated on our good relationship with God, as described in the covenant at Sinai and beyond. In our relationship with God, the land has agency, is both sign and symptom of our connection.

There is already a hint of the overarching power of God in the world, and the meaning this gives our role in the world, in two earlier places in bible – both of which involve “outsiders”. When Malchitzedek, priest and king of Salem, greets Abram after the war of the four against the five, he makes a sacrifice of celebration, and says (Gen 14:19)

בָּר֤וּךְ אַבְרָם֙ לְאֵ֣ל עֶלְי֔וֹן קֹנֵ֖ה שָׁמַ֥יִם וָאָֽרֶץ:

Blessed  is Avram of the Most High God, owner of the heavens and the earth

Later, when Moses speaks to Pharaoh after the plague of hail, Pharaoh entreats Moses to ask God to cease the thunderstorms and the people will go free – and Moses replies “as I leave the city I will spread my hands to God and the thunder will cease…so that you will know that the earth belongs to God. (Exodus 9:29)

The plagues are not only for the Pharaoh or for the Egyptian people to understand the power of God in the world, they are also for the Israelite people trapped in slavery – the God who will lead them out of their misery is the ultimate power, who owns heaven and earth and all that is in them and on them.

So when God tells Moses to tell the encamped ex-slaves down below that God is the owner of heaven and earth, it is not new information, but is being stated here because the covenant depends on their – and our – understanding that we do not own the earth, that we are temporary residents upon it, that our behaviour will dictate whether we are able to live out our days in comfort and plenty – or not.

This week as we celebrated the minor festival of Tu Bishvat, we are reminded that of all the fruit we harvest, a portion must be given in tithe – to go to the priesthood, the vulnerable, those without land to create their own food supply. For the first three years (Tu bishvat is the cut-off date for the years since planting) the fruit will not be eaten (orlah), then the system of tithing (maaser sheni  and maaser  ani) would make the owner of the tree liable for giving a tenth of its produce to the Jerusalem Temple and to the poor.

Harvesting the fruit of a tree is labour intensive work. Giving away a portion of the fruit means we are constantly aware that the tree does not ultimately belong to us – we have use of it, we take care of it, but we cannot own it, nor the land it is rooted in.

As the people camp at the foot of Mt Sinai, the first learning they do is to understand that the earth and everything on it belongs to God.  Whatever our contract with God gives us or demands from us, ultimately this is God’s earth and we are sojourners and settlers who must treat it well or lose the privilege of the land.

We have grown used to ignoring this idea, to buying and selling land and natural resources, to plundering and over-fertilizing and gouging and sowing and tilling and harvesting as we like. We have grown used to making the land serve us rather than we serve it. Tu biShvat, and the words of God in introduction from Sinai  in this sidra come to remind us. “The earth and its fullness belong only to God”.

Parashat Ithrò: il primo apprendimento del popolo è che la terra appartiene a Dio

Di rav Sylvia Rothschild, pubblicato l’11 febbraio 2020

Ordunque se voi obbedirete alla Mia voce e manterrete il Mio patto sarete per me quale tesoro tra tutti i popoli, poiché a Me appartiene tutta la terra. E voi sarete per me un reame di sacerdoti, una nazione consacrata”. (Esodo 19: 5-6)

Lo scenario si colloca poco prima della consegna della Torà al Sinai. Dio ha chiamato Mosè sul monte e gli ha detto cosa doveva dire agli israeliti accampati più sotto. Sta per esserci un accordo particolare tra loro e Dio, e in esso si inserirà una relazione speciale, subordinata al fatto che il popolo di Israele obbedisca a Dio e mantenga l’alleanza: diventeranno una “segulà“, un tesoro, e diventeranno una nazione con un ruolo sacerdotale speciale nel mondo. L’idea si ripete in diversi punti della Bibbia, ma in questa (prima) iterazione, c’è la frase aggiuntiva “Ki li col ha haaretz” – tutta la terra è Mia”.

C’è un passaggio parallelo nel libro del Levitico: nella Parashat Behar, che afferma di riferire ciò che è stato detto al Sinai, ci viene detto (25:23) “E la terra non deve essere venduta per sempre; poiché la terra è mia; poiché voi siete estranei e coloni con Me“, Ki li ha’aretz, “poiché la terra è Mia”.

Al Sinai, quando il popolo incontra Dio, il messaggio è reso molto chiaramente: la terra e tutto ciò che è in essa è, in definitiva, possesso di Dio. Le piaghe che avevano permesso agli ebrei di essere liberi dalla loro schiavitù erano fenomeni di Dio. Anche il Sinai e il suo misterioso scuotimento/fumo/shofar è una manifestazione del potere di Dio nel mondo. Dio è totalmente responsabile della terra: il mondo e tutto ciò che è in esso è soggetto a Dio e alla volontà di Dio.

Al Sinai, nella parashà di Ithrò, e anche oltre, il popolo riceverà non solo le Asseret haDibrot, i Dieci Comandamenti, ma riceverà anche i Mishpatim, tutte le leggi e le sotto-clausole del patto con Dio. E molti di questi hanno a che fare con un adeguato trattamento della terra. Nel testo risonante del Levitico sopra citato, riceveranno le leggi di shemittà e yovel: il ciclo per lasciare riposare la terra e per liberare e ridistribuire la terra stessa ogni cinquanta anni.

Quando Dio si presenta al popolo, è con la frase “perché tutta la terra è mia”. In parte questo è un necessario chiarimento del monoteismo: esiste solo un solo Dio, non le molteplici manifestazioni amate dall’antico mondo dei popoli agricoli. Ma è anche il chiarimento che non siamo, e non saremo mai, i proprietari della terra. Nella migliore delle ipotesi siamo i suoi amministratori; non potrà mai essere venduta ad altri o portata alla sterilità. Non è qualcosa da sfruttare o utilizzare per darci status o potere sugli altri. Come scrive il salmista (Salmo 24)

לַֽ֭יהֹוָה הָאָ֣רֶץ וּמְלוֹאָ֑הּ תֵּ֝בֵ֗ל וְי֣שְׁבֵי בָֽהּ: ב כִּי ה֖וּא עַל־יַמִּ֣ים יְסָדָ֑הּ וְעַל־נְ֝הָר֗וֹת יְכוֹנְנֶֽהָ: ג מִי־יַֽ֭עֲלֶה בְהַ֣ר יְהֹוָ֑ה וּמִי־יָ֝קוּם בִּמְק֥וֹם קָדְשֽׁוֹ: ד נְקִ֥י כַפַּ֗יִם וּבַ֢ר לֵ֫בָ֥ב אֲשֶׁ֤ר לֹא־נָשָׂ֣א לַשָּׁ֣וְא נַפְשִׁ֑י וְלֹ֖א נִשְׁבַּ֣ע לְמִרְמָֽה: ה יִשָּׂ֣א בְ֭רָכָה מֵאֵ֣ת יְהֹוָ֑ה וּ֝צְדָקָ֗ה מֵאֱ֘לֹהֵ֥י יִשְׁעֽוֹ:

            Al Signore appartengono la terra e ciò che essa contiene.

            Poiché Dio ha fondato la terra sui mari e l’ha basata sui fiumi. Chi è degno di salire al monte del Signore e chi potrà stare nel luogo a Lui consacrato? Colui che ha le mani nette ed è puro di cuore; che non si è rivolto a cose false né ha giurato per ingannare. Egli otterrà benedizione dal Signore e la giustizia dal Dio che lo salva.

Il nostro accordo con Dio si basa sul nostro buon rapporto con la terra. E la fertilità e la sistemazione della terra per le nostre esigenze sono basati sul nostro buon rapporto con Dio, come descritto nell’alleanza del Sinai e oltre. Nel nostro rapporto con Dio, la terra ha un ruolo, è sia segno che sintomo della nostra connessione.

C’è già un accenno al potere globale di Dio nel mondo, e il significato che questo conferisce al nostro ruolo nel mondo, in due precedenti luoghi della Bibbia, entrambi i quali coinvolgono “estranei”. Quando Melchisedek, sacerdote e re di Salem, saluta Abramo dopo la guerra dei quattro contro i cinque, fa un sacrificio di celebrazione e dice (Gen 14:19)

בָּר֤וּךְ אַבְרָם֙ לְאֵ֣ל עֶלְי֔וֹן קֹנֵ֖ה שָׁמַ֥יִם וָאָֽרֶץ         Benedetto tu sia,  Abramo,  dal Dio Altissimo, padrone del cielo e della terra.

            Più tardi, quando Mosè parla al faraone dopo la pestilenza della grandine, il faraone invita Mosè a chiedere a Dio di cessare i temporali e il popolo sarà libero, e Mosè risponde “Appena uscito dalla città stenderò le mani verso il Signore in segno di preghiera e allora i tuoni cesseranno… … affinché tu riconosca che la terra appartiene a Dio”. (Esodo 9:29)

Le piaghe non servono solo per far capire al faraone o al popolo egiziano il potere di Dio nel mondo, ma anche al popolo israelita intrappolato nella schiavitù che il Dio che li condurrà fuori dalla sua miseria è il potere supremo, che possiede il cielo e la terra e tutto ciò che è in loro e su di loro.

Così quando Dio dice a Mosè di dire agli ex schiavi accampati più sotto che Dio è il proprietario del cielo e della terra, non si tratta di informazioni nuove, ma la dichiarazione viene fatta qui perché l’alleanza dipende dalla loro, e nostra, comprensione che non possediamo la terra, che siamo temporaneamente residenti su di essa, che il nostro comportamento determinerà se siamo in grado di vivere i nostri giorni in tutta comodità e abbondanza, o no.

Questa settimana, quando abbiamo celebrato la festa minore di Tu B’Shvat, ci è stato ricordato che di tutto il frutto che raccogliamo, una parte deve essere data in decima, per andare al sacerdozio, ai vulnerabili, ai senza terra per creare il loro approvvigionamento di cibo. Per i primi tre anni (Tu B’Shvat è la data limite per gli anni dalla semina) il frutto non verrà mangiato (orlà), quindi il sistema della decima (maaser sheni e maaser ani) renderebbe responsabile il proprietario dell’albero per la donazione di un decimo dei suoi prodotti al Tempio di Gerusalemme e ai poveri.

La raccolta del frutto di un albero è un lavoro ad alta intensità di fatica. Dare via una porzione del frutto significa che siamo costantemente consapevoli che l’albero non ci appartiene in via definitiva: ne abbiamo uso, ce ne occupiamo, ma non possiamo possederlo, così come la terra in cui è esso è radicato.

Mentre il popolo si accampa ai piedi del Monte Sinai, il suo primo apprendimento è capire che la terra e tutto ciò che vi è in essa appartiene a Dio. Qualsiasi cosa il nostro contratto con Dio, ci dia o esiga da noi, in definitiva questa è la terra di Dio e siamo residenti e coloni che devono trattarla bene o ne perderemo il privilegio.

Ci siamo abituati a ignorare questa idea, ci siamo abituati ad acquistare a vendere i terreni e le risorse naturali, a saccheggiare e all’eccessivamente fertilizzare, a scavare, a seminare, a lavorare e a raccogliere come ci piace. Ci siamo abituati a farci servire dalla terra piuttosto che a servirla. Tu b’Shvat e le parole di Dio introdotte dal Sinai in questa sidra vengono a ricordarci. “La terra e la sua pienezza appartengono solo a Dio“.

Traduzione dall’inglese di Eva Mangialajo Rantzer

 

 

Parashat Beshallach Shabbat Shira

Di rav Sylvia Rothschild, pubblicato il 24 gennaio 2013 e ripubblicato il 3 febbraio 2020

Questa settimana leggeremo la Parashà di Shabbat Beshallach, noto anche come Shabbat Shira, lo Shabbat della cantica, perché contiene al proprio interno una cantica, un componimento eseguito dai sopravvissuti, riconoscenti dopo la fuga dagli egiziani e la traversata del Mar dei Giunchi.

La Parashà Beshallach coincide sempre con la settimana in cui celebriamo Tu B’Shvat, il capodanno degli alberi, un momento in cui tradizionalmente si intende che gli alberi stiano iniziando a svegliarsi dal sonno dell’inverno e la loro linfa stia iniziando a rifluire. Mentre celebriamo questa festività minore, che originariamente era una data di scadenze in ambito fiscale, diventiamo maggiormente consapevoli della natura che ci circonda e che spesso dimentichiamo di notare nella frenesia della nostra vita. Ci sono un certo numero di consuetudini che si sono sviluppate intorno a questa data. Piantare alberi, mangiare frutti specifici della terra di Israele: uva, olive, datteri, fichi e melograni, e alcuni dicono anche carruba o etrog (cedro). Esiste un uso nella tradizione cabalistica di cibarsi di quindici diverse varietà di frutti nel quindicesimo giorno di Shevat, una sorta di estensione della prescrizione di “cinque al giorno”. (L’OMS raccomanda di assumere un numero di cinque porzioni giornaliere di frutta o verdura, n.d.T.)

Esiste anche una tradizione cabalistica di svolgere un Seder in cui i frutti e gli alberi della Terra di Israele ricevono un significato simbolico e dieci diversi frutti e quattro bicchieri di vino vengono consumati per aiutare a completare la creazione del mondo. Mi è sempre piaciuta l’idea del mangiare e bere come buon modo per perfezionare il nostro mondo!

Ma c’è un’altra usanza che è molto antica e collegata a questo fine settimana, in particolare con lo Shabbat Shira, che è quella di dar da mangiare agli uccelli. Questa settimana leggiamo della disperazione che segue l’esaltazione dopo che il popolo ha attraversato il Mar dei Giunchi e gli egiziani non li stanno più inseguendo. Hanno fame e sete. L’acqua che trovano è amara e inadatta a essere bevuta. C’è poco cibo da mangiare. Cominciano a gemere e lamentarsi <<Tutta la comunità dei figli d’Israele mormorò contro Mosè e contro Aronne nel deserto. Dissero loro i figli di Israele: “Fossimo pur morti per mano del Signore, nel paese d’Egitto, seduti presso le marmitte contenenti carne e dove si mangiava pane in abbondanza, mentre (Mosè e Aronne) ci avete condotti  in questo deserto per farci morire di fame, tutto questo popolo.”>> (Esodo 16: 2-3).

Ciò che seguì, naturalmente, fu l’apparizione della Manna e delle quaglie per il loro nutrimento: <<E il Signore disse a Mosè: “Ecco io farò piovere per voi un nutrimento dal cielo, e il popolo uscirà e raccoglierà giorno per giorno quanto gli è necessario, in tal modo Io potrò metterlo alla prova, se egli vuole obbedire alla Mia legge o no. Ma nel giorno sesto della settimana, quando prepareranno ciò che avevano portato dal campo, si troverà doppia razione del raccolto giornaliero.”… … Effettivamente alla sera arrivarono in volo le quaglie e coprirono il campo, e al mattino uno strato di rugiada si stendeva attorno al campo. E evaporato lo strato di rugiada, apparve sopra la superficie del deserto qualcosa di minuto, di granuloso, fine come brina gelata in terra. A tal vista i figli di Israele si chiesero l’un l’altro: “Che cos’è questo?” perché non sapevano che cosa fosse. E Mosè disse loro: “Questo è il pane che il Signore ti ha mandato per cibo. Ecco ciò che ha prescritto il Signore in proposito: ne raccolga ognuno tanto secondo le proprie necessità, un omer a testa, altrettanto ciascuno secondo il numero delle persone coabitanti nella stessa tenda, così ne prenderete. ”>> (Esodo 16: selezionato da v4-v 16)

Ci viene però detto nel midrash che il primo Shabbat dopo che il popolo aveva raccolto la manna, essi uscirono per cercare di raccoglierne un po’ anche quel giorno, nonostante ne avessero ricevuto il doppio della quantità il giorno precedente per non dovere andare a raccoglierne a Shabbat. E Rashi ci dice che c’erano persone che si spingevano ancora oltre nel loro cattivo comportamento: costoro non solo erano andati a raccogliere durante Shabbat, ma avevano precedentemente sparso un po’ della loro manna extra attorno al campo in modo che le persone la trovassero e diffidassero di Mosè e di ciò che Dio stava dicendo. Ma, dice il Midrash, gli uccelli arrivarono la mattina presto e mangiarono tutta la manna sparsa, in modo da proteggere la reputazione sia di Mosè che di Dio, e neanche un po’ di manna fu trovata quando il popolo venne a cercarla a  Shabbat. A causa di questa straordinaria gentilezza, la nostra tradizione è di nutrire gli uccelli, in questo Shabbat soprattutto, per ringraziarli.

C’è una seconda ragione spesso citata per la nostra abitudine di nutrire gli uccelli in particolare in questo Shabbat, e ha a che fare con il nome della sidrà: Shira. Dio che ci ha salvati dagli inseguitori egiziani è lodato nel canto, ma il canto è l’abilità speciale degli uccelli, per cui esiste una tradizione mistica che ci dice che dobbiamo ripagarli per esserci appropriati del loro particolare stile di preghiera. Perciò, diamo loro nutrimento.

Ora, non penso che nessuna di queste storie abbia davvero molto fondamento nella realtà, ma noto che così come la primavera è segnata dall’inizio di Tu B’Shvat, spesso c’è una svolta verso un peggioramento meteorologico, e gli uccelli, sopravvissuti a molte settimane di maltempo e di scarso bottino di risorse, possano farcela, con un piccolo aiuto, e per questo motivo mi sembra una buona cosa da fare: spargere un po’ di becchime o appendere qualche pallina di grasso e sentire che facciamo la nostra parte per far tirare avanti alle popolazioni di uccelli. Le storie ci dicono che stiamo ripagando gli uccelli per i loro atti di gentilezza, ma allo stesso modo in cui questa lezione è importante, altrettanto lo è la lezione di prendersi cura del nostro mondo, semplicemente perché è il nostro mondo, perché siamo co-creatori con Dio su questa terra, perché è nostra responsabilità mantenerla attiva e curarla. La nostra tradizione racconta anche che quando Dio creò i primi esseri umani, Dio li guidò attorno al Giardino dell’Eden e disse: “Guardate le mie opere! Guardate quanto sono belle, quanto sono eccellenti! Fate attenzione a non rovinare o distruggere il Mio mondo, perché se lo farete, non ci sarà nessuno a ripararlo dopo di voi.” (Midrash Rabbà, Commento su Ecclesiaste 7:13)

Traduzione di Eva Mangialajo Rantzer

Parashat Beshallach Shabbat Shira

from 2013 but still relevant

rabbisylviarothschild

This week we will be reading Parashat Beshallach, which is also known as Shabbat Shira, the Sabbath of song, because it contains within it the song sung by the grateful survivors of the escape from the Egyptians and the crossing of the Reed Sea.

Parashat Beshallach always coincides with the week we celebrate Tu B’Shvat, the new year for trees, a time when traditionally we understand that the trees are beginning to awake from the dormancy of winter and their sap begins to rise.  As we celebrate this minor festival which was originally a cut-off date for tax purposes, we become more aware of the nature that is around us and that we often forget to notice in the busyness of our lives. There are a number of customs that have grown up around this date. Planting trees, eating the fruits specific to the land of Israel, grapes, olives, dates…

View original post 945 more words